fbpx

A Beginners Guide To Production For A Product Photography Shoot

So you’ve nailed pre-production and now it’s time to produce deliverables for the client.

This is in no way a definitive resource for you or your business, but it’s a starting point. Be sure to research and do your due diligence on what you’ll need to create a seamless service for your client, because at the end of the day, that is what will bring the client back to you, and that is what will give your brand a good reputation.  Here are some of the key points to remember during production:

PRODUCTION

  • Set up your studio and relevant equipment.

Seems like a no brainer right?  Wrong.  You’d be amazed at the things you may forget when you’re first starting out.  Have you charged your battery?  Do you have an extra battery?  Do you have a couple of memory cards in case the one you’re using decides to fail unexplainably?  Do you have your studio light and is it working?  Or, if you’re using natural light only, have you taken into account the weather forecast?  How about your props and any additional things you require to bring your image to life – have they arrived? Have you tested out your settings in camera to decide where you’ll start?

  • Compose your shot

This is where I spend a significant amount of time.  Composition is incredibly important because it can make or break an image, and therefore will make or break your client deliverables.  I studied interior design and have been doing photography long enough to be able to put an image together without too much trouble.  But even I have my days where I’ll be shooting with something I haven’t shot before and I can struggle.  When that happens – and it will happen – take a breather, walk away, and find some inspiration online.  That is not to say you should copy what someone else does, but I find looking at other peoples work inspires me to search within my own creativity and come up with something that looks aesthetically beautiful, unique and most importantly meets the clients requirements and expectations.  You want the eye to move around the image seamlessly, and you want everything within the image to communicate and make sense. I love using the rule of thirds, leading lines and shapes, contrast and layering.

  • Capture your shot & do your basic edits

Are you shooting manual or aperture priority?  Are you capturing in portrait orientation or landscape orientation?  Does the image need to be brighter or more moody?  This is where my tether cord comes in handy – in fact it’s one of my favourite pieces of equipment I have.  It allows the image I capture to show up on my laptop in real time so I can see what it’s looking like, and it allows me to do my basic edits all in the one go.

  • Cross check your shot list to ensure you’ve captured everything that the client is expecting you to deliver

This is so important.  At the end of the day or days of shooting cross check your shot list to ensure you’ve captured every image on your shot list.

So there you have it.  A little production check list for your to consider.

If you liked this post, then please comment below to let me know.  Or if you’re a product photographer, is there something else you have in your production checklist that I haven’t covered? Be sure to pop that info in the comments below.

If you’d like to save this checklist to your Pinterest board then click here to go straight to the checklist.

Want to know more photography behind the scenes, or do you just want to come along for the ride?  Then head on over to the About page to learn more about the origins of my love for photography, or follow me on Pinterest,  Instagram or Facebook for more behind the scenes.

I’ll be starting a monthly newsletter, and would love to let you know when my new print collections are released, so if this is something you might like to be a part of, then please head to my home page, scroll to the bottom of the screen to subscribe.

Deb

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *